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20110701
20110731
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brooks is the most high profile casualty in the scandal that has spread to both sides of the lan tick. she has been at the heart of the storm sweeping rupert murdoch's media empire and remained by his side. now she has decided to step away. in her statement she said, as you can imagine recent times have been tough. i now need to concentrate on rebutting allegations about my record as a journalist and editor and executive. ms. brooks said she felt a deep sense of responsibility for the people news international had hurt. >> i'm pleased that rebecca brooks had finally accepted responsibility for what happened in watch as editor for "the news of the world" with the phone hacking. as i said when i called for her resignation this isn't about one individual. it's about the culture of an organization. the man picked to replace rebecca brooks is already at his desk. tom markridge has been brought from italy. james murdoch thanked ms. brook for 22 years of service adding she has been one of the outstanding editors of her generation and she can be proud in her accomplishments. we applaud her to
papers wrongdoing. rebecca brooks is the high profile casualties so far. now she has decided to step away. in her statement, she said, as you can imagine, recent times have been tough. i now need to concentrate on correcting the distortions and facing allegations of corruption. >> i am pleased that rebekah brooks has finally set the responsibility for what happened on her watch as editor of "news of the world," the hacking of the phones. i called for her resignation 10 days ago. this is not about one individual. it is about the culture of an organization. >> the man chosen to replace her his already at his desk. writing to all news international staff, and james murdock thanked mr. brooks for 22 years of service, adding, she has been one of the outstanding editors of her generation and she can be proud of many accomplishments as an executive. we support her arrest she takes steps to clear her name. that is not a view echoed in the house of lords as one of the most vocal critics referred to her stated desire to remain on the bridge. >> she now says she likes to be on the bridge. i would no
be the chief executive of the pay tv operations. >> rebecca brooks was left to succeed james murdoch. >> i am convinced that the leadership of the company is the right thing. she is doing the right thing for the company. >> the inescapable point is that rebekah brooks is vulnerable. she is the last person standing. these are times of crisis. his father was hoping that he can make this as his business. >> is joining me now is the political editor of the news of the world, the former express and independents editor. i am joined by rupert murdoch plus -- rupert murdoch's biographer. >> who is to blame. how high that goes is still to be seen. the culture comes from need to make stories, the decision to break the rules. the decision to go that extra 200 miles into illegality. they did not know what was going on and that is inconceivable. >> you were rupert murdoch's biographer. you knew him well and his motivations. is it realistic that he did not have a grip at what was going on. he must have an eye on this. was there an inkling that perhaps he would just let things go. he was a control freak, wa
as a force of good. >> we have had a series of tragic news stories. >> rebecca brooks, former editor, describes her pain as her dear friend. they worked together to campaign for sara's law, the public right to know where pedophiles are living. tonight, rebekah brooks said the allegations are a port and upsetting. the idea that anybody on the newspaper knew that sarah payne at or target it is unthinkable. the campaign began in 2000. the man was arrested in 2006. it is not known when he obtained the phone information, whether he intercepted her voice mail and who may have requested it. but it was -- but if it was "news international," this was the reaction. >> what they gave personal support to sara payne and her family. they produced literature, campaign materials, party conferences, introduced her to politicians. i see this as the ultimate betrayal of trust. >> there were high-level meetings and a mobile phone. it may be the one that was targeted. sources linked to miss brooks and the newspaper have said the voice mail on this fund was not activated until 18 months ago, suggesting th
and tragic news, starting with their pain. >> and rebecca brooks described sarah palin as her dear friend. -- sara payne as her dear friend. tonight, rebecca burk said these allegations are abhorrent -- rebecca brooks said these allegations are abhorrent. the sarah's la campaign began in 2000. glenn martarello was arrested in 2006. it is not known when he obtained her information or who might have requested it. if it was news international, this was the reaction of one mp. >> news international did not just campaign for sarah's law. they produced literature, campaign materials, took her to party conferences and introduce her to party politicians. i see this as the ultimate betrayal of trust. >> the newspaper hackers provided the mobile phone. it may be the one targeted. but sources linked to mrs. brooks said the voice mail on this loan was not activated until 18 months ago, suggesting there were no messages. today's allegations surfaced hours after lord justice levenson said his judicial inquiry could begin while the police investigate. >> it should be possible to focus on the extent of t
to hold rebecca broke and -- rebekah brooks and james murdoch to account. this was a summons they could not ignore. >> do the decent thing. the cannot hide away from this level of public anguish. -- you cannot hide away. >> at first, they were reluctant witnesses. rupert murdoch said that he could not attend the session but he was willing to give testimony is an inquiry. rebekah brooks said that "i am available to appear before the committee and welcome the opportunity to do so." she said she would not be able to discuss anything about the police investigation. there was a formal summons. there can even be imprisonment. the threat had worked. the murdochs said they would come and answer the questions. >> in a letter, james murdoch said "i am now coming. i would like to answer them in a different forum." the questions keep coming. why did the news of the world mislead parliament? why did the management failed to find out what was going on and stop it? as for rebekah brooks, we ask about what she told the mps. the mp whose committee will be asking the question was optimistic. >> i hope th
spectacle has little to match the prospect of the murdochs and brooks appearing before the select committee. but did the lineup live up to the hype? how did it shaped up as an event? and what did it tell us, if anything, about the state of our institutions? first, did it cut it as drama? >> rupert murdoch is a bit like king lear, and he is rather surprised how it has turned out. the tension between james murdoch and elizabeth murdock is one of the stories. another is the way that rebecca brooks. and then you have the slightly unexpected situation that comes about because of that. >> you claimed they had made a major mistake. can i ask what mistake you were referring to? >> one of the thing about courtroom drama, there is the unexpected hero. in this instance, it was tom watson. one of the other features was the long pauses, and pauses in theater tend to be associated with chekhov and harold pinter. these were softened daunted -- these were self indulgent beyond that point. >> we spoke to a lawyer who worked for robert maxwell's sons when he faced and p.'s in the 1990's. >> to me, the most e
brooks and rupert murdoch accountable. why were so many people's phones pack in the name of news? it was a summons that they could not ignore. >> do the decent thing. you cannot hide it away from this level of public anguish. >> at first, they were reluctant witnesses. rupert murdoch told the committee he could not attend was to a's session, however looking forward to the inquiry. rebecca brooks said she is available to the committee on that date and welcome the opportunity to do so. but, she said, she would not be able to do -- say anything related to the ongoing investigation into hacking. i find, even imprisonment -- it appears the threat has worked. the murdoch's change their mind and said they would answer the questions. in a second letter, james murdoch confirmed their attendance. he said he was concerned they were asked to answer questions in a different forum. what ever the forum, the questions keep coming. why did news of the world mislead parliament? why were some victims paid? what did the management fail to find out what was going on? we asked about what brooks said.
of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone john yates, who tendered his resignation. >> boras johnson said both men had jumped and were not pushed. but he made it clear he had done everything he could to encourage them. >> it is a concatenation of issues and questions. it is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in the way they wanted. >> yates began the day determined not to resign, telling colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he ended it explaining why he was going. >> we in the police service are truly accountable. those of us to take on the most difficult jobs clearly have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. sadly, there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate
whether he had discussed with rebekah brooks murdoch's now withdrawn $12 billion bid to acquire the mighty british sky broadcasting satellite system. rebekah brooks was murdoch's chief person and the editor at the news of the world in a, quote unquote, personal friend of the prime minister. >> that is why rebekah brooks was quite able to say at the house of commons yesterday that there wasn't a single conversation that coul taken place in front of the select committee. >> question. is cameron insulated by the fact that rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks were also extremely close to the labor party's prime minister, gordon brown? >> no. >> no. >> no. >> especially because gordon brown has come out and said that his medical records were hacked into for a young son with cystic fibrosis. besides, this linked account are the ones that are occurring right now. cameron is acting as though his government could fall. he called for a very strong investigation. i think he will probably eat pie, but he's on very shaky ground. >> let put -- >> my thoughts, please. he's in a coalition government with a l
's friend, rebecca brooks. she's the chief executive of news international in the u.k. she was also the editor of the news of the world when milly went missing. she, like other former executives at the paper, has always said she didn't know about the actions of a few rogue reporters. news international argues she's as shocked as everyone else that the latest twist in the scandal. but also making it plain she doesn't intend to resign. >> i think she's been very clear today that that's absolutely what she won't do. this happened back in 2002. she's now chief executive of a company in 2011, she's absolutely determined to get to the bottom of this issue. >> but the political heat has been turned up on rupert murdoch's news empire. the house of commons will debate the latest allegations on wednesday. opposition politicians say they want a full inquiry set up. they also think rebecca brooks should go. >> it wasn't a rogue reporter. it wasn't just one individual. this is a systematic series of things that happened, and what i want from executives at news international is for people to star
pressure on the prime minister's friend rebecca brooks. she is the chief executive of news international. she was also the editor of the news of the world when the girl went missing. she, like other former executives at the paper, had said that she did not know about the actions of a few reporters. news international argues she is shocked as everyone else. but they are also making the claims she does not intend to resign. >> she has been clear today that that is what she will not do. this happened in 2002. she is chief executive of a company in 2011. she is absolutely determined to get to the bottom of this issue. >> the political heat has been turned up on the murdoch's news empire. the house of commons will debate the latest allegations on wednesday. opposition politicians say they want a full inquiry. they think rebecca brooks should go. >> it was not a rogue reporter. it was not one individual. this is a systematic series of things that happened. what i want from equities -- executives is people to start taking responsibility. >> it is not just news international which is difficult q
and jim byrnes and brooks who created the show, they came to me and said we had a couple of ideas for scripps. just hang in there, like to use you again. what a blessing. you can imagine how thrilling that was. tavis: and the rest, as they say, was history. >> the first year, i did not comment until the fourth year. by then it was a big hit. -- i did not comment until the fourth year. by then it was a big hit. we were sweating the ratings, would they get picked up or not. you cannot imagine that about the mary tyler moore show, but it was an uphill fight. tavis: you have thoughts about the way the television business has changed, back in the day? it would give shows an opportunity to grow and try to find their audience. everything today is about here and now. what do you make of the way business has changed? >> i think audience is the thing that changed. back in those days, you were still the miracle in the corner that people bragged about on the box. now the audience, they have heard every joke, they know every plot line, they know where you are going before you open your mouth.
with a right to the. the police to arrive sometime later. it is the sort of story rebecca brooks would have loved when she edited the news of the world. but now they follow the murdoch into the room. >> such fundamental issues. >> i don't know anyone in their right mind that would authorize approval of anyone listening to the voice mails. >> someone did if and someone covered it up. we did know that this is a day he did not enjoy. >> use of the moment that he was attacked with a plate of shaving phone. -- fome. -- foam. the protester's name is jonathan and has been charged with a public order offense. he is charged with a section 5 of the public order act. the husband turns with the public order offense. same with the story, within the last hour, the a trillion army will have questions to answer there. the country who controls a 70% of the newspapers. he told me how it has been covered by the australian press. this is the front page. >> this is a nice shot of rupert touching his son's arm. the minority group, controls all of the other major newspapers. he and his son looking grim and pretty
the message and then you wipe them off of this poor girl is dead. >> at the time, rebecca brooks was the paper's editor. she is now the chief executive. no specific allegations have been made against her but she is under pressure. this is one of the very few episodes when she was in charge of the paper. she will have to answer questions about what she knew was going on. >> this is one small part of the growing police investigation. in metropolitan police were present of said only that inquiries were continuing. newsday," watching " from the bbc. still to come, we have a special report from japan. as people try to rebuild their lives following the earthquake and tsunami. the duke and duchess of cambridge are making a splash in canada. 14 million pound appeal has been pledged for the horn of africa. 9 million people are at risk of malnutrition. this is the worst drought in 60 years which has affected somalia, kenya, and other countries. >> this is a place where life hangs in the balance every single day. july, 2011, and once again this corner of africa is cursed, teetering on the brink of disast
. it's the type of story rebecca brooks would have loved when he edited the sun or "news of the world." now the exchief followed the murdoches into the committee room and matched their contrition. >> it seems like you were so unaware of such fundamental issues -- >> in some ways i think the opposite. i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize no sanctioned approval, anyone listening to the voice mails under those circumstances. i don't know anyone who would think it was the right and proper thing to do. >> but someone did it, approved it and covered it up. when rupert murdoch swept out of westminster we were no closer to knowing who. we do know this was a day he did not enjoy. >> well, the impact of rupert murdoch news corporation reaches far beyond the u.k. his company was born in australia in 1952 as news limited which today is about 70% of australian numerous. we're joined by a professor at the university of sydney. he joins me now. thank you for joining us. what did you make of the hearings? >> it was like late-night football here. i thought the statement i know n
. they will be more forth right compared to rebecca brooks if she does show up because of the huge legal cloud now directly over her head, it will be difficult for her, i think to be as candid as she may have intended to be otherwise. it will be that much more difficult for the m.p.'s interrogating her to ask the same types of questions they had planned because no one wants to wreck what is now a criminal investigation and of course may become one in terms of the murdoches themselves. >> officials from the american state department and the libyan government held a one-day face-to-face meeting. officials say the talks were a positive step forward. the americans say they delivered a firm message that colonel gaddafi must step down. steve kington in washington gave me the latest. >> what we know is that this meeting took place on saturday in the tunisian capital from the american side, the u.s. ambassador to libya until this crisis blew up in february, together with the senior state department official for the region. they were the representatives of the united states. we don't know who was at the me
daughter elisabeth next to him. and their top editor, rebekah brooks, the red hat on the right. for years a team brown stayed close. no more. the smiles fell away. using criminals to investigate his private life. >> i had my bank accounts broken into. ilesd my lawyers' f blanked. my tax returns went missing at one point. medical records have been broken into. i do not know how all this happened but i do know one thing, into of these instances, there is absolute proof that news international was involved in hiring people to get this information. i also know that the people they work with our criminals. >> court of mankind were looking for information about a flat in this london street in the early 1990's. he said he paid the market rate. the sunday times conceded not. >> are you considering resigning? >> he is not resigning. his newspaper had been out to bring brown down as a government minister he climbs. the statements -- the paper said we believe no law was broken. the story was published giving all sides a fair hearing. mr. brown also talk about another paper. he attacked the way it re
meetings with news international bosses with rebekah brooks and with rupert murdoch. he left london today on the morning after the most humble day of his life. >> did he ever discuss the question of the bid with news international? >> i never had one inappropriate conversation. >> it was the third time of asking and labor did not like the answer. >> i completely took myself out of any decision making about this. i had no role in it. i had no role in when the announcements would be made. >> what david cameron did was to rhetorically unhire andy card -- andy coulson. it was a day when more police officers were hired to address more allegations of hacking guaranteeing that there will be more days in which the prime minister's judgment will be questioned. >> the irish prime minister has launched an unprecedented attack on the roman catholic hierarchy. he accused the vatican of protecting the power and reputation of the church ahead of the child rape victims. the clerical abuse exposed an institution that was defeatist. >> the church and state in ireland have been linked for generations. that
more next tuesday when mr. murdoch uhis son james and rebecca brooke, ceo of news international, the uk unit face questioning in parliament. >> susie: this raises questions about succession. rupert murdoch has always talked about having one or all of his kids running the company. james, has been the heir apparent. what is the future of the murdoch dynasty? >> it's probably in jeopardy right now. the outcry against the murdochs in the uk has not really begun to penetrate the situation in the market here. but independent directors of news corp may be looking at that whole question of succession, and the murdoch dynasty. certainly the market has been downgrading over the years news corp because of the nepatistick approach bringing his three kids into the company. that has depressed the share price and market value of news corp. it's very likely that there may be somebody other than a murdoch running the company in the future. >> susie: let's talk a little. we were talking to a big institutional shareholder who is very concern body the outlook for this stock. would you buy news corp at $16.
because of the scandal. rebekah brooks, the chief executive of news international, and dow jones c.e.o. les hinton stepped down. >> tom: norwegian cruise lines is setting sail for the stock market. the miami-based company filed for an initial public stock offering today. it hopes to raise $250 million to repay debt. no word on when it will come to market, but it will trade on nasdaq under the ticker n-c-l-h. also heading the nasdaq? zillow. the real estate listing service today detailed its stock offering plans. it hopes to raise $71 million by selling 3.5 million shares priced as high as $18 a share. it gets the coveted single- letter ticker "z." >> susie: even though investors have a long worry list, tonight's "market monitor" is still optimistic about the outlook for the markets. he's ted cronin, c.e.o. and chief investment officer at manchester capital. the vermont-based investment firm manages almost $2 billion in assets. nice to have you on the program, welcome to your first market monitor. >> thank you very much, it's a pleasure to be here this evening. >> susie: since this
happen under rebecca brooks' leadership. that is clear backing for news international's chief executive. even though she was editor of the news of the world at the time of the alleged hacking of mini dowler and the families. today, company executives say they knew who sanctioned that. she apparently was away at the time. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever's in power, he is the real puppet master. tonight, he, they, no one knows how this extraordinary drama will end. nick robinson, bbc news, westminster. >> aid agencies have issued an urgent appeal for help for millions of people who have been affected by drought in east africa. the crisis has been particularly detch stating in -- stave stating in somalia, kenya, uganda and ethiopia. millions of people have walked nor days to get to a refugee camp in kenya. ben brown has this report. >> among the refugees of this camp, there are hundreds of lost children and orphans. some got separated from their families on the long walk from somalia. others, like abdi salam and his sister, isha, no longer have parents. their father died i
.e.o. rebekkah brooks in her job, despite calls for her resignation. >> tom: it took almost two decades, but the u.s. and mexico have finally signed a deal to let each other's trucks have unlimited access to each other's highways. this provision was originally part of the nafta agreement, signed back in 1994, but both countries argued for years over safety and financial issues. and there's still opposition. the teamsters union says the deal is probably illegal and opens the border to dangerous trucks. >> susie: in the "money file," making your good credit score work harder for you. here's donna rosato, senior writer at "money magazine." >> got a good credit score? you do if you've got a score of 740 or higher. just one third of americans are members of that elite club. if you're one, you already know that a good credit rating will nab you the lowest rates on a home or auto loan. but it also gets you access to some pretty good deals elsewhere too. credit cards have notoriously high rates, averaging more than 14%. but many credit card issuers seek out top credit score holders by offering
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